Crowdsourcing helps with Educational Games

26.05.2014
Having fun and learning is a good combination. The so-called “serious games” prove that for gaming systems, computers, and cell phones. “Serious games” have been used in various areas for a long time now.

Too much to do and even forgotten the shopping list?

Stress management and memory-training apps such as BrainJogging are being integrated into the world of Smartphones. Recently, the “Stress Free” app was included in the National Health Service’s (NHS) list of acknowledged measures for health care. The app provides playfully easy instructions for different relaxation exercises that can restore inner balance if used correctly. Physical fitness can also be considerably improved with moving and sport games. It is even more fun to do it in groups. The gaming market has a huge range on offer including dancing, golf and yoga and even virtual sailing.
However, in some less amusing areas such as military training, games like Close Combat or VBS 1&2 (Virtual Battlespace System) are also being used by many Armed Forces around the world to practice manoeuvres and behaviours in military conflicts.

The Crowd as game-makers

Crowdsourcing is now being used in the development of Serious Games. Helpers from the Crowd were asked to describe their daily activities – from getting up to sitting down to dinner – on an online platform for an educational game project. In the next stage, the Crowd activities were evaluated and successfully classified as realistic.
The goal was to improve computer games for training police. The different daily activities of the platform members function as a realistic alibi for the fictitious perpetrators in the computer game.

VirtualSuspect

The idea for the project „VirtualSuspect“ came from the Doctoral Candidate Sigal Sina from the Bar Ilan University of Israel together with her team. The application, which is still in the development stage, will probably be used for other Serious Games as well. From now on, these Serious Games should help the police to optimise their abilities and tactics in the interrogation of potential criminals. This is a great practice for critical situations made possible through Crowdsourcing.